Thursday, 18 March 2010

Make a difference in a couple of minutes

I strongly believe in the idea that one person can make a difference if they persist in what it is they are trying to achieve. I am a member of Amnesty International who I feel do a superb job at working towards equality and basic human rights for everybody because, as much as we feel our world is developed there are still some places that are stuck in the dark ages and the people that live in those places are subject to lifestyles that would make others recoil in horror.

In issue 160 of the Amnesty magazine there is a small piece on what people can do in a couple of minutes to make a difference and I thought it would be an ideal thing to share here on my blog in the hope that some of the people who read my blog would take a few minutes out of their busy lives to help other people. If one person (me) can inspire just a handful of other people (you) to do the following things and then in turn you inspire a few people (your friends, colleagues, family, twitter followers etc.) then what started out as one person doing an action to help someone can turn into more than a dozen or so people doing a small action that will lead to potenially large, positive outcomes. Think about it...

Action 1) Two minutes: Call on the Prime Minister to prevent the UK becoming a safe haven for war criminals. Ask him for a clear statement that the UK government will not sek to alter the law that allows UK courts to prosecute war crimes suspects, where their crimes were committed.


Action two) Two minutes: Call on the Azerbaijani authorities to relase journalist Eynulla Fatullayev, and to investigate his claim that prison officers planted drugs in his cell so as to bring new charges against him.


Action three) five minutes: Help secure the release from Guantanamo bay of UK residents Shaker Aamer and Ahmed Belbacha


visit http://www.amnesty.org.uk/aamer


You don't have to do any of the actions above if you don't agree with what they are asking for, afterall, you are fortunate enough to have human rights and the ability to freely choose what you can or cannot do, or what you do or do not believe. However, never under-appreciate that.

No comments:

Post a Comment